06 October 2013

Social Strategy 140: Direct Action #Risk...

The Twitter IPO is now a reality and real-time direct action (DA) "Information Warfare" between nation states is a daily task.  Current and future Operational Risk Management (ORM) priorities will encompass the imperative to staff "Corporate Intelligence Unit" Fusion Centers.  A prudent Operational Risk strategy, shall include a "Big Data" capability combined with deep social intelligence analysis. Here is one example of why some business leadership is devoting new resources and investment to these internal risk management capabilities:
New Diplomatic Avenue Emerges, in 140-Character Bursts
By SOMINI SENGUPTA 
UNITED NATIONS — Countries all over the world, dictatorships and democracies alike, have in the last few years sought to tame — or plug entirely — that real-time fire hose of public opinion known as Twitter. 
But on the sidelines of the General Assembly meeting over the last couple of weeks, ministers, ambassadors and heads of state of all sorts, including those who have tussled with Twitter the company, seized on Twitter the social network to spin and spread their message. 
At the height of the diplomatic negotiations last week over a United Nations Security Council resolution that would require Syria to turn over its stockpile of chemical weapons, the American ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, used Twitter to pre-empt criticism of the measure as lacking teeth because it had no automatic enforcement provision.
What does this mean for the global enterprise, who circumnavigates the planet to initiate and manage daily business operations?  It means that "Information Warfare" and intelligence collection and analysis for the enterprise, is a top strategic and operational function.  It requires continuous Operational Risk oversight and strategy.

How an organization directs personnel and manages daily decisions, is more mobile information-centric than ever before.  Just stand at any major sidewalk intersection in a major city across the world and count the number of people looking at their "Smart phones" as they cross the street.  The speed of business that is fueled by leaders commenting via social media, can even influence commodity traders in futures markets and operational planners in the "E-ring."

Leadership has the ability to by-pass the traditional media juggernauts to get their message heard in seconds.   The President of a major stock exchange or of a G20,  has a "Duty of Care" to it's constituents to make the correct public decisions.  At the same time, a moral and ethical context begins to evolve, in the vast battle space of 140 digital characters.

The use of a social media post or Tweet from the Board Room to the Court Room; from San Francisco to Tehran, or from Wall Street to Hong Kong, is a risk-oriented asymmetric information tactic delivered in plain sight.  Those social tactics, visual in the landscape of our modern day quest for influence, notoriety or outcry, shall forever shape the breadth of our enterprise digital risk management spectrum.